Blogroll

I read blogs, as well as write one. The 'blogroll' on this site reproduces some posts from some of the people I enjoy reading.

Disclaimer: Reproducing an article here need not necessarily imply agreement or endorsement!

Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans NZ response to gay marriage vote

Anglican Ink - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 23:38

It is with deep sadness that (FCANZ) receives the news that General Synodhas passed the Motion 29 Report allowing the blessing of same-sex relationships

New Zealand church adopts local option on gay blessings

Anglican Ink - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 23:28

The Anglican Church this morning has paved the way for the blessing of same gender relationships.

SVG Formatter - Critical - Cross Site Scripting - SA-CONTRIB-2018-027

Drupal Contrib Security - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 21:28
Project: SVG FormatterDate: 2018-May-09Security risk: Critical 15∕25 AC:Basic/A:User/CI:Some/II:Some/E:Proof/TD:AllVulnerability: Cross Site ScriptingDescription: 

This module adds a new formatter for the file fields, which allows any file extension to be uploaded.
The module doesn't sufficiently handle sanitization under the scenario uploaded SVG files.
This vulnerability is mitigated by the fact that an attacker must have a role with the permission create or edit on certain content types that allows SVG files to be uploaded.

Solution: 

Install the latest version:

Also see the SVG Formatter project page.

Reported By: Fixed By: Coordinated By: 
Categories: Technology

Reforming their Lordships and Ladyships

Adam Smith Institute - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 17:21

Many commentators think it inevitable that the House of Lords will be reformed. The present mix–part hereditary and elected by their peers, and part appointed and chosen by the government–is difficult to justify in principle, and has failings that are all too evident in practice.

Some of the activities and powers of the Lords have been restrained by convention rather than by law. The famous Salisbury Convention, by which the Lords will not impede laws that were in the manifesto on which the government was elected, is not legally binding; it is only a convention. Recent years have shown that convention is a poor restraint on political expediency.

Convention decreed that the Parliament Act that could shorten the delaying power of the Upper House to one year rather than three, was limited to matters of vital national security. That was what was promised in the chamber when it was enacted. Yet it was used by the Blair government to push through the ban on fox-hunting–hardly the most vital of national security issues.

The unelected Lords have voted for measures designed to thwart Brexit or to render it meaningless, despite the clear majority it enjoyed in the largest vote ever seen in the UK, and the government’s manifesto promise to deliver it.

Opinions differ over the type of reform needed. Many oppose an elected Second Chamber because it would divide along party lines. It would have an electoral mandate to challenge the Lower House, and would make it nigh on impossible for talented achievers in different fields to sit there, depriving the country of the vital role they play in scrutinizing forthcoming legislation.

Instead of the total overhaul that such a step would demand, it might be preferable to tweak the present arrangement to reduce or remove its failings. Some have proposed either a compulsory retirement age, or a limit to the number of years for which a member might sit.  

It would make sense to separate the legislative power from the honour bestowed, by separating life peers into those who sat to legislate, and those who received the title as a personal honour for achievement but did not sit in the chamber.

Perhaps the most sensible reform would be to change the legislative powers into advisory ones, so that instead of passing amendments to bills, the Lords would pass recommendations for the Lower House to consider. The expertise of its talented achievers would not thus be lost, while the problem of unelected authority which could overrule elected authority would be resolved.

By their recent actions the Lords have brought forward the need to redress some of the anomalies that presently characterize it. The aim of the reforms should be to preserve the good presently done by the Upper House, while removing some of the abuses it currently allows.
 

Categories: Current Affairs

End the attacks on our free press

Adam Smith Institute - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 16:13

In the 6th Century BC the Greek poet Theognis of Megara, writing of the myth of Pandora’s box, detailed how awful mankind had become, how far we had fallen:

"Trust, a mighty god has gone, Restraint has gone from men,
and the Graces, my friend, have abandoned the earth.
Men's judicial oaths are no longer to be trusted, nor does anyone
revere the immortal gods; the race of pious men has perished and
men no longer recognize the rules of conduct or acts of piety."

It’s a tale as old as time, that we’re on a recent fall from grace, but it somehow still draws in supporters. And the same arguments made in the 6th Century against the failings of mankind are made today of the press by its detractors. They argue while the press was once a true and noble force it now can’t be trusted, that it has overstepped the mark with our precious celebrities, that it no longer recognises the old noble ways and must now be reigned in

No; No; and No again.

The Leveson Inquiry looks to have been a pandora’s box for the fight for press freedom. After the initial multi million pound inquiry (estimated to have cost taxpayers £5.4m and the industry £43.7m), leftover sections of the Crime and Courts Act 2013 continue to threaten our free press. 

Mrs Thatcher was onto something when she said “you may have to fight a battle more than once to win it.” And perhaps we should all expect sly politicians to use a wholly separate bill on data protection to sneak in the old proposal for papers to bear the cost of all legal cases brought against them (even when they win, and no matter how spurious the allegation). 

The other option open to papers, under the amendment that sees implementation of Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act, would mean papers forced to sign up to a state-recognised regulator of the press. One of the regulators licensed by the state is Impress, set up and bankrolled by the backers of the legislation and anti-press campaigner Max Mosley.

The press has been free of licensing by the crown since 1695, free of a secretary of state issuing warrant against authors or papers they accuse of libel and free of duties payable since 1870. That this is being brought up as an idea again now is both sad and worrying. 

Those in the Commons and Lords should know the public are well aware of the benefits of a free press and also know the stifling effects this law could have on it. A public consultation on the issue in 2016 saw 174,730 responses, with 79% wanting Section 40 to be repealed in full and just 7% wanting it implemented. The most common reason given to repeal it was the worry of the ‘chilling effect’ it would have on the freedom of the press. 

We’ve argued before of the value of a free press that prints with neither fear nor favour, that keeps the powerful honest and all of us in the loop. None of that has changed, its importance to us grows as more and more consume media in more and more varied forms. 

While we can never put the evils of the world back in Pandora’s Box, this is not true of MP’s actions on the press. They can begin by shooting down Tom Watson and Ed Miliband’s amendments today, and then by repealing Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013. If politicians fail to act this will keep being snuck in by those that hold vendettas against the press. They only need to win once to snuff out our free press. 

Update: MPs narrowly defeated Ed Miliband's amendment and, after the SNP said they would abstain, Watsons withdrew his. This is a temporary win though, until Section 40 is repealed the press remains under threat. 

Categories: Current Affairs

Outrage Overload

Blog & Mablog - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 15:41
Introduction:

There are two ways to develop a sensitive conscience, one good and one bad. The first is to accept, own, and practice the weightier matters of the law. Once you have mastered the great principles, or rather have been mastered by them, it becomes possible to move into the more refined questions. This is the principle we see in Hebrews 5:14. “But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.” (Hebrews 5:14, ESV). The longer one walks with God, the better able he is to see the first stirrings of a resentment or a lust.

The bad way to grow a sensitive conscience—let us call it an inflamed conscience—is to go in the opposite direction, by flouting the weightier matters of the law, insulting the basic principles of morality. A bad conscience develops and because human beings have a deep need to be called righteous (even when they are wicked), we then dedicate ourselves to the development of gnat-filters, all while laughing at those legalistic camel-phobes.

Take For Instance . . .

Consider the scrupulosity of those men who paid Judas to betray Jesus in their plot to murder Him judicially. Having accomplished the worst crime in all the annals of human history, and after Judas realized what he had done and came back to return the money to them, they were fastidious about which account it went into. Having murdered God’s Son, they did not want to displease Him any further by not following the best practices for financial accountability.

We have examples of both kinds of sensitivity in That Hideous Strength. After Mark Studdock confronts Dr. Dimble on the whereabouts of his wife, Dr. Dimble drives back to St. Anne’s full of self-doubts. Was there a whole Belbury inside him too? And Wither, while subjecting the world to all manner of mayhem, is fastidious about which methods of, er, interrogation would be the most humane in the long run.

But What If the Cat Self-Identifies . . .

Our PC culture has run amok, as all sane observers know, but few know that it is running amok precisely because of this second kind of moral inversion. We are fanatical about the gnats because we have swallowed all of the camels. Let Chesterton say it:

“It is the final sign of imbecility in a people that it calls cats dogs and describes the sun as the moon—and is very particular about the preciseness of these pseudonyms. To be wrong, and to be carefully wrong, that is the definition of decadence.”

A nation that slaughters millions of unborn babies, that has sanctified sodomy as though it could be matrimony, that worships at the altars of Mammon the way we do, is a nation that must be indignant with anyone who does not recycle. Having been crushed by the mountains, we are off to lecture the molehills.

An Example:

As I think I have made clear a number of other times, I believe that Thabiti is a gracious Christian brother, a good man. But a good man can breathe bad air and after a while it can start to affect you. In Thabiti’s apology to Beth Moore, he wrote this:

“And I have let others slander you. I’ve been in rooms where your name was mentioned with disparaging tone. And rather than ask a few basic questions (how do you know this about her, do you have any evidence you can point us to, and so on), I said and did nothing. I wasn’t any different from Saul standing by holding clothes while Stephen was stoned.”

Really? Right after that, Saul went out and made havoc of the church (Acts 8:3). In the next chapter, he was breathing threats and slaughter (Acts 9:1). Paul describes himself in this period as an insolent man and a blasphemer (1 Tim. 1:13). In his persecuting fury, he compelled Christians themselves to blaspheme (Acts 26:11).

Now I have little doubt that Thabiti thought he was “doing a Dimble,” wanting to make sure that there was not a whole Sandredrin inside him. There isn’t—but there is a raging mob outside. Take a look around.

The moment we think we are in is not the moment we are actually in. Allow me to pile up a few metaphors in an unconscionable way. We have quarterbacks who can really throw the ball, but none of them can read any kind of defense. We have parade-ground generals who look smart in uniform, but who do not have the slightest notion of what the enemy is doing. We have leaders without skin in the game, and the results have been absolutely predictable.

Paige Patterson has been accused of various things, about which I know nothing, but it is striking to me that the air was not filled with guffaws over the fact that it was Jonathan Merritt, his very own bundle of ambulatory issues, who brought the accusation.

The Church Must Be the Gyroscope:

In a world that has gone topsy-turvy, the church must be the gyroscope. But what is happening is not anything like that. More than a few of us have come to the conviction, if you can call it that, that we should be topsy-turvy for Jesus. Anything the world can get unsettled about, we can be unsettled about five years later and with a verse attached.

Now—and here comes the hard part—in order to avoid being a pale echo of the world’s current confusions, what must the church learn how to do? We must learn how to apply our boot to the hinder parts of absolutely any attempt at political correctness, multiculturalism, diversity, cultural Marxism, critical theory, sensitivity, and whatever new smock they throw over its pointy little head.

A Little Heads Up:

The Reformed evangelical establishment is currently acting in almost precisely the same way that the Republican establishment was acting prior to the rise of Trump. That was how they got Trump. Never has a leadership group been so disconnected from how their base was feeling. This happened because 1. The leadership would not listen to what the people were trying to say, 2. The people felt great pressure to not say anything about the problems that weren’t going away, and 3. The leadership persisted in repeating the “all-is-well” platitudes that they remember got Reagan elected.

Our conference circuit leadership is displaying all the same characteristics, representing millions of people who are not really represented by them. With certain notable exceptions, the leadership is insular, in-grown, sensitive to bad publicity, accommodating, easily-manipulated, and comfortable. R.C. Sproul is with the Lord, as is Billy Graham, and we don’t have regularly scheduled elections. It will be interesting to see which way the pressure cooker blows.

But when it comes, it will be the result of this combination. There will be exhaustion over all the petty things that are upsetting the delicati, outrage overload, and there will be another kind of exhaustion over the heavy burdens that everyone helps to tie on and no one helps to carry.

 

 

The post Outrage Overload appeared first on Blog & Mablog.

Categories: People I don't know

Scrollable Content - Critical - Unsupported - SA-CONTRIB-2018-026

Drupal Contrib Security - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 15:19
Project: Scrollable ContentDate: 2018-May-09Security risk: Critical 16∕25 AC:None/A:User/CI:Some/II:Some/E:Proof/TD:DefaultVulnerability: UnsupportedDescription: 

Scrollable Content provides a scrolling functionality for your content. Scrollable Content will give you a nice content slider preview of your site's nodes, and provides some display options.

The security team is marking this module unsupported. There is a known security issue with the module that has not been fixed by the maintainer. If you would like to maintain this module, please read: https://www.drupal.org/node/251466.

The security team marks all unsupported modules critical by default.

Solution: 

If you use the Scrollable Content module you should uninstall it.

Reported By: 
  • Balazs Janos Tatar Provisional member of the Security Team
  • Fixed By: 

    N/A

    Categories: Technology

    Simple Taxonomy Revision - Critical - Unsupported - SA-CONTRIB-2018-025

    Drupal Contrib Security - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 15:16
    Project: Simple Taxonomy RevisionDate: 2018-May-09Security risk: Critical 16∕25 AC:None/A:User/CI:Some/II:Some/E:Proof/TD:DefaultVulnerability: UnsupportedDescription: 

    Simple Taxonomy Revision module enables revisions for taxonomy terms for Drupal 8.

    The security team is marking this module unsupported. There is a known security issue with the module that has not been fixed by the maintainer. If you would like to maintain this module, please read: https://www.drupal.org/node/251466.

    The security team marks all unsupported modules critical by default.

    Solution: 

    If you use the Simple Taxonomy Revision module you should uninstall it.

    Reported By: 
  • Balazs Janos Tatar Provisional member of the Security Team
  • Fixed By: 

    N/A

    Categories: Technology

    KCFinder integration - Critical - Unsupported Module - SA-CONTRIB-2018-024

    Drupal Contrib Security - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 15:14
    Project: KCFinder integrationDate: 2018-May-09Security risk: Critical 16∕25 AC:None/A:User/CI:Some/II:Some/E:Proof/TD:DefaultVulnerability: Unsupported ModuleDescription: 

    KCFinder is a multi-language file / image manager you can use to easily select, insert, upload and arrange images, flash movies, and other kinds of files.

    The security team is marking this module unsupported. There is a known security issue with the module that has not been fixed by the maintainer. If you would like to maintain this module, please read: https://www.drupal.org/node/251466.

    The security team marks all unsupported modules critical by default.

    Solution: 

    If you use the KCFinder integration you should uninstall it.

    Reported By: 

    Neil Drumm of the Drupal Security Team

    Fixed By: 

    N/A

    Categories: Technology

    Multi-Step Registration - Critical - Unsupported Module - SA-CONTRIB-2018-023

    Drupal Contrib Security - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 15:09
    Project: Multi-Step RegistrationDate: 2018-May-09Security risk: Critical 16∕25 AC:None/A:User/CI:Some/II:Some/E:Proof/TD:DefaultVulnerability: Unsupported ModuleDescription: 

    With Multi-Step Registration you can create multi-step (wizard) user account registration forms.

    The security team is marking this module unsupported. There is a known security issue with the module that has not been fixed by the maintainer. If you would like to maintain this module, please read: https://www.drupal.org/node/251466.

    The security team marks all unsupported modules critical by default.

    Solution: 

    If you use the step module for Drupal you should uninstall it.

    Reported By: 

    Ayesh Karunaratne

    Fixed By: 

    N/A

    Categories: Technology

    LifeFest 2018 - Keep Marching

    Christian Concern - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 14:50
    LifeFest 2018 and March for Life was held on Saturday, May 5. Regan King went along and shares some of his experiences and thoughts on the event and the issues which were addressed. 'Every life deserves love'

    LifeFest 2018 and March for Life was held on Saturday, May 5. Regan King went along and shares some of his experiences and thoughts on the event and the issues which were addressed.

    On Saturday, May 5, 2018 up to 4,500 people gathered in central London to participate in LifeFest 2018 and March for Life UK.

    read more

    Two New E-Books

    Blog & Mablog - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 13:50

     

     

     

     

     

     

    I have added two new eBooks to my Mablog Shop eWarehouse—you can find them at the top of the listings here. You may click on either of the covers to get there, but let me explain them briefly here.

    One is a collection of quotes of mine, a chrestomathy, on the subject of education. The quotes are from all over—well, not from all over because I don’t have anything there from Recovering the Lost Tools or from Repairing the Ruins. But there will be subsequent editions, Lord willing, and some pithy sayings from those places will be inserted as well. Also I hope to release additional little chrestomathies, on topics like Calvinism, Postmillennialism, and so on.

    The second book is called A Parliament of Pots, and is a collection of various parabolic sketches I have written over the years, going back to the early years of Credenda.

    As is true of just about every item in the Mablog bookshop, each one of these books costs one dollar, one clam, one greenback, one buck, and you get the picture.

    The post Two New E-Books appeared first on Blog & Mablog.

    Categories: People I don't know

    Idolatry After Idols

    Peter Leithart - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 13:00
    During the Second Temple period, the Talmud says, “the temptation for idolatry was slaughtered” (quoted in Haberthal and Margalit, Idolatry, 2). Then the fight returned, with Maimonides. Now, though, idolatry was a contrast-concept to a new conception of God. Halberthal and Margalit summarize: “The central effort of philosophical religion is the attempt to attain a […]
    Categories: People I don't know

    No Graven Images

    Peter Leithart - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 12:00
    The First of the Ten Words speaks to the question of whom we worship: We are to have no other gods before the face of Yahweh. The Second Word had to do with how we worship: We are to approach God as He commands us to approach Him. The Second Word is sometimes misunderstood. It […]
    Categories: People I don't know

    Adult Social Care: Let’s Get On With It

    Adam Smith Institute - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 12:00

    Adult social care, with one sixth of the NHS budget, is the poor relation in terms of government oversight. The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has 19 quangos to help it run the NHS and none for adult social care – not that quango deprivation is a bad thing.  Nor does it manage the funding; the department for Local Communities does that.

    It has had no shortage of advice: a Royal Commission in 1999, an influential King’s Fund report in 2005, and the Dilnot Commission in 2011. An untrailed and untried proposal for funding adult care introduced during the last general election campaign nearly cost the Prime Minister her job. A green paper is expected in 2018 but no date has been announced and there are few clues when it might be due. The section concerned is apparently too short of staff to clarify the time-line.

    However, the relevant two Commons’ Select Committees have decided to press ahead with their own initiative. Good for them. They have set up a 45–50 person focus group, rather grandly called a “Citizens’ Assembly”, to devote two weekends to listening to alternative proposals for funding adult social care, and then making their recommendations. Citizens’ Assemblies have been used in Canada, The Netherlands, Ireland and Poland but this is the first time the UK government has adopted the idea.

    The idea is one that the left proposed and saw its heyday in 2015 when the Greens, Labour, and the Liberal Democrats were all pushing for a 'citizen-led constitutional convention' on the future of the UK constitution. There's perhaps a reason why the left is so keen. After all, 45 people are easier to steer over a weekend than a whole electorate. But whatever the conclusions may be, what comes out of the consultation must be a valuable stimulus – whether government action follows or not.

    Unfortunately, it could have been better planned.  The weaknesses are fourfold:

    1. It is widely agreed that adult care services should, in future, be better coordinated with the NHS. We're still not at the point where we know what the funding arrangement between NHS and social care will be. Citizens' Assembly members should be considering how to fund adult care as it will be, not as it is.

    2. The research and analysis has been delegated to Involve which is “a public participation charity that aims to put people at the heart of decision-making”. A more fatuous claim to fame is hard to imagine: in this pre-AI age, who else can be “at heart of decision-making”? Involve is actually a sub-quango, i.e. part of, and funded by, the National Institute for Health Research, one of the half dozen quangos within the DHSC umbrella which sponsor research activities. This project is not in their usual line of work and an independent professional market research firm would have been better placed to conduct it. Cost may have played a part in that decision: this arrangement uses DHSC funds, along with two outside charities, to finance the work. Perhaps a false economy.

    3. A 45 - 50 person sample is too small to produce reliable results for the analyses envisioned: “The members are being recruited with the help of ICM to be representative of the English population in terms of age, gender, ethnicity, socio-economic group, place of residence, and attitudes towards a small/large state. They will include people with direct experience of social care for both working age adults and older people.”  Contrast that with a much less fundamental (in terms of the numbers and costs involved) research project into why ethnic/faith groups are reluctant to donate organs for transplantation: “A total of 22 focus groups were held in six multiethnic areas of London with 228 participants from six ethnic/faith groups (who identified as West African Christian, black Caribbean Christian, Indian Sikh, Indian Hindu, Pakistani Islamic and Bangladeshi Islamic). There were separate focus groups for older people (> 40 years) and younger (18–40 years), and for men and women among older South Asian people.”

    4. We are not told if this work was put out to public tender. Quangos all too rarely encounter competition and so all too often quality is found lacking. There is little here to suggest Involve will break this rule. And there is a worry that a quango, which is not a professional market research firm, would not be so strictly impartial. 

    In short, the Select Committees should be congratulated on putting their shoulders to this slow moving wheel.  It is just a pity the research is not being more professionally conducted.

    Categories: Current Affairs

    Which is more important: cat videos or investment?

    Adam Smith Institute - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 11:00

    The House of Commons is in the middle of one of its fits of inconsistent moralising.

    They are creating a panic about data protection; worried that our private information is being sold and must be protected. Facebook can somehow tell what we might be persuaded to buy based on which cat videos we like; more amazingly, people believe that Cambridge Analytica used the same information to change how we voted (Cambridge boffins joining with Russia to subvert Western democracy?! It’s like being back in the ‘70s).

    The House of Commons is in full “something must be done” mode, trying to force Mark Zuckerberg to appear before its committee to answer questions. More strongly, later this month the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) comes into force; a new expensive, bureaucratic and complex system to protect our data and ensure that it is not used without our permission.

    The principle behind all of this is that our personal information should remain private, used only for authorised purposes, and this is apparently so important that it must be protected by law.

    Yet the same month that this is happening, the same House of Commons voted to force the UK-linked Overseas Territories (such as the Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands and Gibraltar) to publish their registers of the beneficial owners of shares in all companies registered there.

    This is said to be necessary to combat tax evasion, but that is simply not true; the shareholder registers already exist, and are available for inspection by tax authorities around the world. All this will do is force the same information to be made available to the public.

    Rather than helping stop tax evasion, public registers will make the tax authorities’ job more difficult. People will be less willing to have their personal information made public, and so will either hide their ownership or shift their investments to jurisdictions where such information is not available to anyone. The wide ranging and accurate information currently available privately to tax authorities will be reduced by this reform.

    The only people who are pushing for this information to be made public are tax campaigners. But from what we have seen of previous data leaks (the Panama Papers and so on), there will be little careful analysis of the information, to see who might be engaged in tax evasion, but lots of searching for famous names to smear people who are in the public eye.

    The last round of media investigation into “offshore” companies attacked David Cameron over his father’s investment company, despite the fact that Cameron had paid his tax in full. It also outed actress Emma Watson for using an offshore structure to hide her London address from obsessive fans (due to the government’s tough laws against offshore investment in the housing market her scheme would probably have increased her tax bill, not reduced it).

    But the media’s gleeful publicity is only part of the problem. Once public, this data can be abused. Of course it has been before.

    Scammers already use publicly available information about shareholders to target people who may be tricked into investing in fraudulent schemes; increase the data available and you make their life easier, increasing the risk of people losing their savings.

    But worse, there are many places in the world where public registers risk much more than a ‘phone call from a dodgy investment scammer'. Countries where being known to have money makes you, and your family, a target for thieves, kidnappers and extortionists. There is a good reason why a lot of South American money, for example, is kept in the Caribbean; it is simply not safe to keep it at home.

    The House of Commons is being very parochial, viewing the rest of the world by British standards and forgetting that many of our Overseas Territories have a much more internationalist approach than our MPs do. Public registers will mean that people from dangerous countries will be pushed out of the British overseas territories. Their need for confidentiality, for personal safety, will mean that they will instead have to put their assets into less regulated jurisdictions where it will be more difficult, not easier, for tax authorities to get the information they need. 

    Do our politicians never think through their demands in a joined-up manner? They say that data protection is important. But which is more important: that our financial details are confidential (open to tax inspectors, yes, they have been for years, but not made public for anyone to see), or hiding our social media likes?
     

    Categories: Current Affairs

    Beta: Alt-PHP updated

    CloudLinux - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 09:13

    New updated Alt-PHP packages are now available for download from our updates-testing repository.

    Changelog:

    alt-php56-5.6.36-2

    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup.

    alt-php70-7.0.30-2

    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup.

    alt-php71-7.1.17-2

    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup.

    alt-php72-7.2.5-2

    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup.

    Update command:

    yum groupupdate alt-php --enablerepo=cloudlinux-updates-testing

    Install command:

    yum groupinstall alt-php --enablerepo=cloudlinux-updates-testing
    Categories: Technology

    Beta: HardenedPHP updated

    CloudLinux - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 09:06

    New updated HardenedPHP packages are now available for download from our updates-testing repository.

    Changelog:

    alt-php44-4.4.9-83

    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup;
    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76130 Heap Buffer Overflow (READ: 1786) in exif_iif_add_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76248 LDAP-Server Response causes Crash;
    • ALTPHP-460: fix for bug 75981 Stack-buffer-overflow while parsing HTTP response.

    alt-php51-5.1.6-95

    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup;
    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76130 Heap Buffer Overflow (READ: 1786) in exif_iif_add_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76248 LDAP-Server Response causes Crash;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76249 Stream filter convert.iconv leads to infinite loop on invalid sequence;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76129 (CVE-2018-10547) Reflected XSS on the PHAR 403 and 404 error pages via request data of a request for a .phar file;
    • ALTPHP-460: fix for bug 75981 Stack-buffer-overflow while parsing HTTP response.

    alt-php52-5.2.17-121

    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup;
    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76130 Heap Buffer Overflow (READ: 1786) in exif_iif_add_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76248 LDAP-Server Response causes Crash;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76249 Stream filter convert.iconv leads to infinite loop on invalid sequence;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76129 (CVE-2018-10547) Reflected XSS on the PHAR 403 and 404 error pages via request data of a request for a .phar file;
    • ALTPHP-460: fix for bug 75981 Stack-buffer-overflow while parsing HTTP response.

    alt-php53-5.3.29-80

    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup;
    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76130 Heap Buffer Overflow (READ: 1786) in exif_iif_add_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76248 LDAP-Server Response causes Crash;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76249 Stream filter convert.iconv leads to infinite loop on invalid sequence;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76129 (CVE-2018-10547) Reflected XSS on the PHAR 403 and 404 error pages via request data of a request for a .phar file;
    • ALTPHP-460: fix for bug 75981 Stack-buffer-overflow while parsing HTTP response.

    alt-php54-5.4.45-60

    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup;
    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76130 Heap Buffer Overflow (READ: 1786) in exif_iif_add_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76248 LDAP-Server Response causes Crash;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76249 Stream filter convert.iconv leads to infinite loop on invalid sequence;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76129 (CVE-2018-10547) Reflected XSS on the PHAR 403 and 404 error pages via request data of a request for a .phar file;
    • ALTPHP-460: fix for bug 75981 Stack-buffer-overflow while parsing HTTP response.

    alt-php55-5.5.38-41

    • ALTPHP-499: fixed patch for LiteSpeed SIGTERM cleanup;
    • ALTPHP-498: fixed an ability to override parameters with ini_set() that were defined via php_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76130 Heap Buffer Overflow (READ: 1786) in exif_iif_add_value;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76248 LDAP-Server Response causes Crash;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76249 Stream filter convert.iconv leads to infinite loop on invalid sequence;
    • ALTPHP-495: fix for bug 76129 (CVE-2018-10547) Reflected XSS on the PHAR 403 and 404 error pages via request data of a request for a .phar file;
    • ALTPHP-460: fix for bug 75981 Stack-buffer-overflow while parsing HTTP response.

    Update command:

    yum groupupdate alt-php --enablerepo=cloudlinux-updates-testing

    Install command:

    yum groupinstall alt-php --enablerepo=cloudlinux-updates-testing
    Categories: Technology

    Surprise, the National Farmers' Union wants more of our money post-Brexit

    Adam Smith Institute - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 07:01

    We've mentioned before that we've a vision for what the government and taxpayer support for British farming should be post-Brexit. Nothing. To go the full New Zealand option and thereby lower the cost of land and thus the costs of doing or going into farming.

    Not to anyone's surprise the National Farmers' Union doesn't agree:

    The NFU has released its vision for a sustainable, profitable and progressive future for farm businesses in response to Defra’s consultation on a domestic agriculture policy which closes today.

    What follows there is a page of the usual corporate blatherspeak. What they're actually suggesting is:

    For a consultation on the potential reforms that closes on Tuesday, the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) is submitting proposals that suggest the NHS, schools, the government and other publicly run services that use government buying standards should be “wherever possible, sourcing British assured ingredients”, except for products not grown in the UK.

    If followed through, this would ensure a market of tens of billions of pounds a year to British farming and food production and secure millions of jobs.

    Instead of picking out pockets directly with subsidies they will do so indirectly through higher prices paid by the taxpayer. No, we still prefer our solution.

    Get the farmers off the public teat as we first did in 1846 and watch as, as they did then, the costs of food fall to the benefit of us ll.

    Categories: Current Affairs

    Bo bishop on trial for theft of Ebola fund

    Anglican Ink - Wed, 09/05/2018 - 03:10

    Four senior officials of the Anglican Diocese of Bo in Sierra Leone have been sentenced to three years imprisonment after having been convicted of stealing over 2 Billion Leones

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