Blogroll

I read blogs, as well as write one. The 'blogroll' on this site reproduces some posts from some of the people I enjoy reading.

Disclaimer: Reproducing an article here need not necessarily imply agreement or endorsement!

Crown of Hair

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

According to 2 Chronicles 23:11, the people put a “crown” on the head of seven-year-old Joash, the Davidic scion who  represents the restoration of the Davidic kingdom after an interregnum. 

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Categories: People I don't know

Infant Mortality

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

T he Economist reports on the racial gap in American infant mortality rates: “Black babies born in America are more than twice as likely as white ones to die before their first birthdays.”

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Categories: People I don't know

Joshing With God

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

The TLS “Poem of the Week” was James Fenton's “God, a Poem.” It opens with this complaint to God:

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Categories: People I don't know

Religion of Fullness

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

In his contribution to Joy and Human Flourishing , Jurgen Moltmann observes that modern theories of religion trace it to “misfortune.” Marx is representative: “Religion is the sigh of the oppressed creature.” Religion must be useful, must meet a need, “because everything in the modern world must be necessary; otherwise it is superfluous and useless.”

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Categories: People I don't know

In Defense of Vengeance

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

Robert Solomon argues ( The Joy of Philosophy ) that “Vengeance is the original passion for justice. The word ‘justice' in the Old Testament virtually always refers to revenge.” This isn't isolated or primitive: “throughout most of history the concept of justice has been far more concerned with the punishment of crimes and the balancing of wrongs than with the fair distribution of goods and services.”

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Categories: People I don't know

Big Philosophy

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

Robert Solomon's The Joy of Philosophy is a defense of philosophy as a joyful wisdom, a la Solomon's philosophical hero, Nietzsche. Solomon knows that Nietzsche isn't even considered a philosopher by many: “His prose is too shimmering, too full of sarcasm and wise-cracks, too personal. He has too much fun. (Too many exclamation points!).”

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Categories: People I don't know

Fanny Price

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

Few readers love Fanny Price. Some hate her as deeply as Mark Twain professed to hate her creator. CS Lewis had Screwtape call her “not only a Christian, but such a Christian—a vile, sneaking, simpering, demure, monosyllabic, mouselike, watery, insignificant, virginal, bread-and-butter miss . . .  A two-faced little cheat (I know the sort) who looks as if she’d faint at the sight of blood, and then dies with a smile . . . Filthy, insipid little prude!”

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Categories: People I don't know

God's Purpose and the Church

Peter Leithart - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00

In his Christian Ethics and the Church (67), Philip Turner provides a masterful summary of “the link Ephesians makes between the fulfillment of God's purpose, the perception of God's glory, and the common life of the assembly”:

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Categories: People I don't know

Mark Thornton Explains Our Fake Economy

Mises Institute - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 05:00
By: Mark Thornton, Jeff Deist
Mark Thornton on Mises Weekends

Dr. Mark Thornton joins Mises Weekends to explain the "business cycle" for what it really is: a series of booms (credit expansion) and busts (debt de-leveraging) engineered by central banks.

There's nothing natural, real, or sustainable about the current Yellen boom—so stay tuned for Mark's explanation of how it can all unravel.



Categories: Current Affairs

The Part-Time Critics of Central Banks

Mises Institute - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 04:00
By: Mark Spitznagel
fed_0.JPG

There seems to be no shortage today of investors and pundits criticizing the market interventions of the world’s central banks. Monetary stimulus in the form of artificially low interest rates and bloated central bank balance sheets ($18.5 trillion, to be exact), the argument goes, have created another dangerous financial bubble (evidenced by ubiquitously bubbly stock market valuation ratios) that ultimately threatens the financial system yet again. The author shares wholeheartedly in this criticism.

The ethical problem is, where were these voices when this all started, with Greenspan in the 1990s and, more specifically, with Bernanke in 2008? The central bank critics today who were not critics of — and in most cases were even sympathetic to — the great bailouts and stimulus that started almost a decade ago have reserved their criticisms only for those interventions that appear to hurt their interests, as opposed to those that have helped them. After all, no one would disagree that bailouts and monetary stimulus got us out of the last financial crisis, but they also certainly got us to where we are today, vulnerable to another even bigger one.

We are so concerned about our friend the strung-out junkie, though we paid little mind when they were but a casual user. It is so easy to care when problems become obvious and critical, so hard when they are subtler and nascent. Artificial stimulus in an economy is the same: it is easily ignored as a problem in its infancy, but it always develops into a huge problem. Economies and markets are structurally altered and distorted by such stimulus, such that it cannot be removed without breaking those new structures. It must rather be ever increased, though even this will only delay an inevitable collapse.

It is just too easy in today’s investing environment, and even necessary for most participants, to sympathize with and even exploit central bank interventions. Doing otherwise creates an opportunity cost in one’s career and investments. But doing so puts one in the position of enabler to the economic system’s self-destructive dependence on artificial stimulus. One cannot be a part-time classical liberal, criticizing central planning only when it runs contrary to one’s interests. Indeed, this is the very problem of Socialism: there are winners and losers; the winners are in the here and now — the seen; the losers are in the future — the unseen. The winners don't complain, and the losers can‘t until it is too late.

But as the future becomes the here and now, the unseen becomes the seen, those who now think they are anticipating a problem and its cause, yet supported that same cause when they stood to benefit, must be seen for what they are: fellow travelers in the central planning ideology that grips today’s financial markets. They are too late.



Categories: Current Affairs

The High Cost of "Free" College

Mises Institute - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 04:00
By: Nathan Keeble
grad.PNG

Tennessee Promise, and now Tennessee Reconnect, are the first programs of their kind in the United States. Through these programs designed by now gubernatorial candidate Randy Boyd, the state will pay tuition for all that seek an associates degree from a community college. They are everything that progressives like Bernie Sanders have wanted for decades. President Obama has said that they should serve as an example for the entire nation. Tennessee, one of the most conservative states in the Union, has become a champion of single-payer education.

One of the defining aspects of the Tennessee Promise and Reconnect programs is the source of their funding. Instead of being funded directly through taxpayer money from the state’s general fund, these programs are bankrolled by money generated by Tennessee’s state run lottery. This detail was essential to the legislation’s enactment, courting otherwise conservative or libertarian legislators.

The use of lottery funds seemed to overcome many ethical and economic objections. Unlike taxes, people choose to pay for lottery tickets. Promise and Reconnect weren’t like other government programs because they at least appeared to be funded voluntarily, just like a business. At first glance, the dangers of a single-payer system in education are largely, if not completely, neutralized.

Enough people were convinced by this argument that the legislation easily passed. However, closer scrutiny will reveal that the Tennessee Promise and Reconnect programs do not avoid any of the ethical or economic pitfalls of government programs such as these.  

What Is Seen and What Is Not Seen In Lottery Funds

Nobody is forcing the man standing in front of them at the gas station coercing him into buying a lottery ticket instead of another product of equal price. His choice of purchasing a lottery ticket in lieu of another good is indeed voluntary. Everyone can see this as true. However, what is not being seen clearly is that the man’s choice of lottery ticket and its supplier is not voluntary at all.

Like the majority of states, Tennessee strictly prohibits gambling, giving only occasional, temporary exemptions for charities to hold fundraising raffles. In 2002, a constitutional amendment was ratified granting a total monopoly to the state of Tennessee to provide a lottery. As the 2002 amendment reiterates, “All other forms of lottery not authorized herein are expressly prohibited unless authorized by a two-thirds vote of all members elected to each house of the General Assembly for an annual event operated for the benefit of a 501(c)(3) organization located in this state...”

Because the state prevents any sort of competition, the revenue generated by the lottery program is not a genuine market outcome. In a free market, this revenue, at the very least, would be split among competing firms. State revenue generated through monopoly gains is every bit as coercive and invasive in a market economy as revenue generated through taxation, even if it is less obvious.

Whether or not one should support the legalization of gambling is beyond the scope of this article. What is necessary to recognize is that Tennessee’s lottery revenue is a deviation from what would occur in a market, and that money which is spent from its fund is equivalent in character and economic effect to any other type of government spending. 

Why Tennessee Should Break Its "Promise"

Tennessee Promise and Reconnect are a part of the Drive to 55 program, championed by Governor Bill Haslam and gubernatorial candidate Randy Boyd. The primary goal of this initiative is to see that 55 percent of Tennessee residents complete some form of college education. The chief economic flaw is revealed through the arbitrariness of this goal.

RELATED: "Don’t Confuse the Cost of College with the Cost of an Education" by Ryan McMaken

Why does Tennessee need 55 percent of its residents to have a college degree? Why not 62 percent or 87 percent? No answer can be given. Furthermore, which 55 percent of Tennesseans should go to college? Some students are necessarily more adept than others. Even more important is the question of the composition of the education they receive. What should students study and how many should enter each career path? The truth is that Tennessee Promise, as well as government in general, is uniquely ill-equipped to answer these critical questions.

Like any other resource, human resources are only as valuable in the economy as the wealth it produces for consumers, a truth that every good economist since Carl Menger has understood. At any given time, an economy only needs so many people working in each occupation. If too many degrees in a particular field are granted, a gap will form in the labor market resulting in chronic underemployment, which means trouble for workers suffering from a lack of income and consumers whose needs are not being met as effectively as they should be. Indeed, no economy can function unless resources, both tangible and intangible, are allocated properly in accordance with the desires of consumers.

The only method that can, and invariably will, answer the questions “what degrees, how many of them, and for which students?” is the market price system. In a market unhampered from government intervention, private lenders would direct financing to students who are most likely not only to graduate, but also to the students who are most likely to succeed in their planned careers, enabling them to repay their loan. They do so because they are subject to profit and loss. Private lenders must direct student financing efficiently and effectively to avoid insolvency.

Tennessee Promise and Tennessee Reconnect necessarily do away with all of the above. These programs do not face insolvency due to their funding source and provide student financing indiscriminately to all who come. In the absence of any rational ability to coordinate education resources to the demands of the labor markets and consumers, a serious misalloaction of labor is the only possible outcome. For the real world, this misallocation means years of people’s lives squandered, income forsaken, and wealth consumed.

To say that Reconnect and Promise are the Federal Student Loans program on steroids is not hyperbole, and the damage which federal student loans have done to students, colleges, and the labor market is visible to anyone with open eyes. Effects of state intervention in student financing have caused such upheaval in young people’s lives that an outwardly socialist candidate nearly became the DNC’s nominee for president in a populist surge largely over this issue, something previously unimaginable.

Tennessee should be a trail blazer in limiting the disastrous effects of government involvement in higher education. In part because it was misguided by what is nothing more than a technicality in funding, the state is becoming a leader in higher education’s march off a cliff instead. The world of education financing is in desperate need of profit and loss bearing entrepreneurs, who can use market prices to rationally direct capital. Real reform must focus on unleashing the marketplace, not limiting it and growing the state.



Categories: Current Affairs

Help with your Hebrew, step 1

Emmanuel Evangelical Church - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 00:00

It's the time of year when theological students have finished their exams and have a few months to forget everything they've learned since September. And the first thing to disappear from the mind of the average student is the large stack of Hebrew vocabulary and grammar that they've spent the last nine months stuffing into their aching brain.

Actually, let's be honest, it never really stuck in the first place, did it?

Don't worry - all is not lost.

Wouldn't it be great if you could get to the start of next semester better at Hebrew than you were just before your end-of-year exams?

Well, it's all now possible with the help of 100 Hebrew Translation Exercises.

100 Hebrew Translation Exercises contains 100 short texts from the Hebrew Old Testament, together with English translations, footnotes to help with unusual or irregular phrases, and a vocabulary list.

So, now you have no excuse.

Enjoy.

Categories: Friends

Calls to worship

Emmanuel Evangelical Church - Fri, 14/07/2017 - 00:00

I was reading through Robert I. Vasholz's excellent book Calls to Worship, which prompted me to look again at the liturgical responses we use at the start of our services at Emmanuel. With the help of Vasholz, we now have a set of ten call-and-response elements which feature as part (not all) of the "Call to Worship" portion of our liturgy. We'll be cycling through them on successive weeks. Just on the off-chance that they're useful to anyone else, here they are:

Ezekiel 37:12, 14

Thus says the Lord God: ‘Behold, I will open your graves
and raise you to new life, O my people.
And I will put my Spirit within you,
and you shall live.
Then you shall know that I am the LORD;
I have spoken, and I will do it,’ declares the LORD.

 

Isaiah 60:1-2

Arise, shine, for your light has come,
and the glory of the LORD has risen upon you.
For behold, darkness shall cover the earth,
and thick darkness the peoples;
but the LORD will arise upon you,
and his glory will be seen upon you.

 

Psalm 33:20–22

Our soul waits for the LORD;
he is our help and our shield.
For our heart is glad in him,
because we trust in his holy name.
Let your steadfast love, O LORD, be upon us,
even as we hope in you.

 

Ps 106

Save us, O LORD our God,
And gather us from among the nations,
that we may give thanks to your holy name,
and glory in your praise.
Blessed be the LORD our God,
from everlasting to everlasting.
Praise the LORD!

 

Psalm 118:19; Zechariah 8:21

The LORD has opened the gates of righteousness,
that we may enter through them
and give thanks to his name.
Let us seek the favour of the LORD,
and rejoice in his goodness!

 

Isaiah 55:1-3, 6

“Come, everyone who is thirsty,
come to the waters,” declares the LORD.
“Incline your ear, listen diligently to me,
draw near to me, that your soul may live!”
Let us seek the LORD while he may be found,
and call upon him while he is near!

 

Psalm 30:3–4, 12

Sing praises to the LORD, all you his saints,
and give thanks to his holy name,
for he has brought you up from the grave,
and spared your life from the pit!
O LORD our God,
we will give thanks to you for ever!

 

Psalm 29:1–2, 11

Ascribe to the LORD glory and strength,
ascribe to the LORD the glory due to his name;
worship the LORD in the splendour of holiness!
May the LORD give strength to his people;
May the LORD bless his people with peace!

 

Psalm 50:1, 5, 15

The Mighty One, God the LORD,
speaks and summons the earth:
“Gather to me my faithful ones,
who made a covenant with me by sacrifice!”
Let us call upon the LORD;
he will deliver us, and we will glorify him!

 

Psalm 66:1–4

Shout for joy to God, all the earth;
sing the glory of his name;
give to him glorious praise!
Awesome are his deeds, and great is his power,
all the earth will worship him and sing praise to his name!

 

Categories: Friends

All We Got Were These Queequeg Piercings

Blog & Mablog - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 20:48

There is an old joke that has an evangelical say something like this to a liberal—“I’ll call you a Christian if you call me a scholar.” But whenever conservative believers enter into the world of such trade-offs, the end result is always something like Simple Simon going to the fair. They come home, if they come home at all, shivering in their skivvies. They don’t get the scholarship, and they lose the faith once delivered. When you sell your birthright for a mess of pottage, at some point in the affair you find yourself with no birthright anymore and no pottage anymore either.

Lewis stated the principle this way:

“It is since Christians have largely ceased to think of the other world that they have become so ineffective in this. Aim at Heaven and you will get earth ‘thrown in’: aim at earth and you will get neither.”[1]

In a similar context, I recently argued this: “Wanting to Matter is the central lust of evangelicalism, and this is why evangelicals are having such trouble believing the Word (John 5:44).” Not only have evangelicals wanted to matter in the world of scholarship, they have also wanted to matter in the world of the arts. And then what happened?

This desire has opened up a broad way for those have wanted to address our need to “engage with culture.” I do not object to the denotations of these words—one of the tags on this blog is “Engaging the Culture.” That’s a good thing. (By the way, speaking of this, stay tuned for our roll out on next year’s Grace’s Agenda.) So engaging with culture is not only grand, it is also necessary. But many use the tagline “engage with culture” as cover for their developing plans to compromise with culture, surrender to culture, or otherwise lick the boots of culture.

As we have engaged with culture, this has entailed engaging with the arts. But what engaging with the arts has meant practically is that many of us have decided—instead of giving ourselves to the hard word of aesthetic discipline—to imitate the world by We are not engaging with culture, we are learning to preen and prance as though we had.copping a pose instead. We are not engaging with culture, we are learning to preen and prance as though we had.

If you want to learn what the “tell” is for this, look for this combination—claims for the aesthetic development coupled with a dramatic increase in ugliness, amateurism, or incompetence. I can’t tell you how many times I have heard Christians urging us to leave behind our suburban white bread ho-hummery, to strive for excellence in the arts, with the disconcerting result that they are then wide open to all kinds of suggestions coming from the Faction for the Uglification of America. The list of their accomplishments is a very long one, but the prep work for it came in the early stages from people supporting our calls for truth, goodness, and beauty. But then what we got was blue hair, tattoos, and Queequeg piercings.

What we got was a creepy gay offertory at Tim Keller’s church, one that ended with an artistic tip of the hat to the forthcoming threesome. I suppose as a dance it was a success in that none of them fell over, but as an attempt at Christian art, it was ugly. Leave aside the moral question for a moment. I simply want to point out that it failed on the very grounds being used to justify it. You have appealed to Caesar, to Caesar you will go. If you are willing to shatter scriptural standards for the sake of the artistic triumph, that is the first problem. But the second was that your artistic triumph was actually lame. It was poor. It was bad. It made sensitive souls go ick ick ick.

Evangelicals in the arts—apart from a robust, resurgent, aggressive, and somewhat belligerent Puritanism—are always going to be squishy and soft. They are going to enter the salons diffidently, hats in hand, shuffling quietly. They are not going to notice the “kick me” sign that someone stuck on their back.

I mentioned something in passing the other day about Eugene Peterson’s shipwreck, his train derailment, his helicopter crash, his apostasy. But there is another element to this. The soft evangelical, the moderate, and the burgeoning liberal all have this in common. They fancy themselves attuned to the arts. They believe that—unlike the fundamentalist rubes—they actually care about how the glancing light through the stained glass falls upon the altar. But again, aside from the questions of truth and morality—“Other than that, how was the play, Mrs. Lincoln?”—we need to remind ourselves that the aesthetic refinement of the compromisers is not all that.

Here is an observation I made a few years ago about Eugene Peterson’s aesthetic understanding in Wordsmithy.

But it was his 2002 colloquial rendition of the Bible, The Message, where Peterson really made it as a writer. But translating the Bible means translating the Psalms, and the Psalms are one of the poetic glories of all human history. Now Peterson’s conviction is that “give us this day our daily bread” and “pass the potatoes” come “out of the same language pool” (p. 2). He wants continuity of language whether we are studying the Bible or fishing for rainbow trout (p. 4).

The misfire result is that in the Message Psalms he has taken a collection of Hebrew glories and crammed them full of English cliches — “lie through their teeth,” “within an inch of my life,” “the end of my rope,” “only have eyes for you,” “down on their luck,” “every bone in my body,” “sit up and take notice,” “rule the roost,” “the bottom has fallen out,” “free as a bird,” “kicked around long enough,” “my life’s an open book,” “at the top of my lungs,” “nearly did me in,” “sell me a bill of goods,” “wide open spaces,” “stranger in these parts,” “hard on my heels,” “from dawn to dusk,” “skin and bones,” “turn a deaf ear,” “eat me alive,” “all hell breaks loose,” “raise the roof,” “wipe the slate clean,” “miles from nowhere,” and, as they say on the teevee, much, much more. If cliches were candied fruit, walnuts, and raisins, the Book of Psalms in The Message would be a three-pound fruitcake.

Aesthetic relativism can keep bad artists afloat for a little bit. But they all eventually sink, the evangelicals first.

[1] C. S. Lewis, A Year with C. S. Lewis: Daily Readings from His Classic Works, ed. Patricia S. Klein, 1st ed. (New York: HarperOne, 2003), 358.

The post All We Got Were These Queequeg Piercings appeared first on Blog & Mablog.

Categories: People I don't know

Imunify360 2.3-30 released

CloudLinux - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 20:04

We are pleased to announce that the new Imunify360 2.3-30 production version is now available. The latest version embodies further improvements of the product as well as the new features. Imunify360 also has become more reliable and stable due to the bug fixes described below.

Should you encounter any problems with the product or have any questions, comments or suggestions, please contact our support team at cloudlinux.zendesk.com: Imunify360 department. We’d be more than happy to help you.

Imunify360 2.3-30

Changelog:

  • DEF-2519: skip certs without key in Plesk SSL;
  • Plesk: preformance improvements.

To install new Imunify360 version 2.3-30 please follow the instructions in the documentation.

To upgrade Imunify360 run:

yum clean all yum update imunify360-firewall

More information on Imunify360 can be found here.

Categories: Technology

The Content Cluster Muster (07.13.17)

Blog & Mablog - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 17:00

Some Important Observations

The Importance of Christology

Did God make Jesus? How you answer may be the difference between your eternal happiness or your eternal sorrow. pic.twitter.com/vzN9PoXyrj

— Desiring God (@desiringGod) July 10, 2017

Sermon Help

Babylon Bee has created a great tool for preachers:

Lettuce Savor These Food Puns

A post shared by The Foodnited States (@foodnitedstates) on Feb 10, 2016 at 12:30pm PST

Happy Birthday, Murica! ???????????? Which Foodnited State are you celebrating from?

A post shared by The Foodnited States (@foodnitedstates) on Jul 4, 2017 at 7:37am PDT

Gollum’s Inner Trump

The post The Content Cluster Muster (07.13.17) appeared first on Blog & Mablog.

Categories: People I don't know

CloudLinux 6 kernel updated

CloudLinux - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 14:29

The new updated CloudLinux 6 kernel version 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.30 is available for download from our production repository.

Changelog since 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.29:

  • CKSIX-109: backported fix for r1soft backup solution from CL7;
  • CKSIX-117: optimized memory allocation mechanism in network operations;
  • CKSIX-120: do not kill kernel threads while OOM.

To install new kernel please run the following command:

yum install kernel-2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.30.el6 kmod-lve-1.4-30.el6
Categories: Technology

Beta: PHP for EasyApache 4 updated

CloudLinux - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 14:06

The new updated ea-php packages are available for download from our updates-testing repository.

Changelog:

ea-php56-5.6.31-1.cloudlinux

  • (core) 73807: Performance problem with processing post request over 2000000 chars;
  • (core) 74111: Heap buffer overread (READ: 1) finish_nested_data from unserialize;
  • (core) 74603: PHP INI Parsing Stack Buffer Overflow Vulnerability;
  • (core) 74819: wddx_deserialize() heap out-of-bound read via php_parse_date();
  • (gd) 74435: Buffer over-read into uninitialized memory;
  • (mbstring): Add oniguruma upstream fix (CVE-2017-9224, CVE-2017-9226, CVE-2017-9227, CVE-2017-9228, CVE-2017-9229);
  • (openssl) 74651: negative-size-param (-1) in memcpy in zif_openssl_seal(;
  • (pcre) 74087: Segmentation fault in PHP7.1.1(compiled using the bundled PCRE library);
  • (wddx) 74145: wddx parsing empty boolean tag leads to SIGSEGV;
  • LSPHP SAPI updated to 6.11.

ea-php70-7.0.21-1.cloudlinux

  • (core) 74738: Multiple [PATH=] and [HOST=] sections not properly parsed;
  • (core) 74658: Undefined constants in array properties result in broken properties;
  • (core): Fixed misparsing of abstract unix domain socket names;
  • (core) 74101: , bug #74614 (Unserialize Heap Use-After-Free (READ: 1) in zval_get_type;
  • (core) 74111: Heap buffer overread (READ: 1) finish_nested_data from unserialize;
  • (core) 74603: PHP INI Parsing Stack Buffer Overflow Vulnerability;
  • (core) 74819: wddx_deserialize() heap out-of-bound read via php_parse_date();
  • (dom) 69373: References to deleted XPath query results;
  • (gd) 74435: Buffer over-read into uninitialized memory;
  • (intl) 73473: Stack Buffer Overflow in msgfmt_parse_message;
  • (intl) 74705: Wrong reflection on Collator::getSortKey and collator_get_sort_key;
  • (intl) 73634: grapheme_strpos illegal memory access;
  • (mbstring): Add oniguruma upstream fix (CVE-2017-9224, CVE-2017-9226, CVE-2017-9227, CVE-2017-9228, CVE-2017-9229);
  • (oci8): Add TAF callback (PR #2459);
  • (opcache) 74663: Segfault with opcache.memory_protect and validate_timestamp;
  • (openssl) 74651: negative-size-param (-1) in memcpy in zif_openssl_seal();
  • (pcre) 74087: Segmentation fault in PHP7.1.1(compiled using the bundled PCRE library);
  • (pdo_oci): Support Instant Client 12.2 in --with-pdo-oci configure option;
  • (reflection) 74673: Segfault when cast Reflection object to string with undefined constant;
  • (spl) 74478: null coalescing operator failing with SplFixedArray;
  • (standard) 74708: Invalid Reflection signatures for random_bytes and random_int;
  • (standard) 73648: Heap buffer overflow in substr;
  • (ftp) 74598: ftp:// wrapper ignores context arg;
  • (phar) 74386: Phar::__construct reflection incorrect;
  • (soap) 74679: Incorrect conversion array with WSDL_CACHE_MEMORY;
  • (streams) 74556: stream_socket_get_name() returns '\0';
  • LSPHP SAPI updated to 6.11.

ea-php71-7.1.7-1.cloudlinux

  • (core) 74738: Multiple [PATH=] and [HOST=] sections not properly parsed;
  • (core) 74658: Undefined constants in array properties result in broken properties;
  • (core): Fixed misparsing of abstract unix domain socket names;
  • (core) 74603: PHP INI Parsing Stack Buffer Overflow Vulnerability;
  • (core) 74101: , bug #74614 (Unserialize Heap Use-After-Free (READ: 1) in zval_get_type;
  • (core) 74111: Heap buffer overread (READ: 1) finish_nested_data from unserialize;
  • (core) 74819: wddx_deserialize() heap out-of-bound read via php_parse_date();
  • (date) 74639: implement clone for DatePeriod and DateInterval;
  • (dom) 69373: References to deleted XPath query results;
  • (gd) 74435: Buffer over-read into uninitialized memory;
  • (intl) 73473: Stack Buffer Overflow in msgfmt_parse_message;
  • (intl) 74705: Wrong reflection on Collator::getSortKey and collator_get_sort_key
  • (mbstring): Add oniguruma upstream fix (CVE-2017-9224, CVE-2017-9226, CVE-2017-9227, CVE-2017-9228, CVE-2017-9229);
  • (oci8): Add TAF callback (PR #2459);
  • (opcache) 74663: Segfault with opcache.memory_protect and validate_timestamp;
  • (opcache): Revert opcache.enable_cli to default disabled;
  • (openssl) 74720: pkcs7_en/decrypt does not work if \x1a is used in content;
  • (openssl) 74651: negative-size-param (-1) in memcpy in zif_openssl_seal();
  • (pdo_oci): Support Instant Client 12.2 in --with-pdo-oci configure option;
  • (reflection) 74673: Segfault when cast Reflection object to string with undefined constant;
  • (spl) 74478: null coalescing operator failing with SplFixedArray;
  • (ftp) 74598: ftp:// wrapper ignores context arg;
  • (phar) 74386: Phar::__construct reflection incorrect;
  • (soap) 74679: Incorrect conversion array with WSDL_CACHE_MEMORY;
  • (streams) 74556: stream_socket_get_name() returns '\0';
  • LSPHP SAPI updated to 6.11.

To update run the command:

yum clean all --enablerepo=cl-ea4-testing yum update ea-php* --enablerepo=cl-ea4-testing
Categories: Technology

PHP for EasyApache 4 updated

CloudLinux - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 13:59

The new updated ea-php packages are available for download from our production repository.

Changelog:

ea-php51-php-5.1.6-10.cloudlinux

  • added requiring for ea-libnghttp2;
  • EA-6484: clarified Summary and Description for DSO;
  • EA-6232: built -curl with HTTP/2 support;
  • added ea-php51 symlinks to /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin.

ea-php52-php-5.2.17-14.cloudlinux

  • added requiring for ea-libnghttp2;
  • EA-6484: clarified Summary and Description for DSO;
  • EA-6232: built -curl with HTTP/2 support;
  • added ea-php52 symlinks to /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin.

ea-php53-php-5.3.29-14.cloudlinux

  • added requiring for ea-libnghttp2;
  • EA-6484: clarified Summary and Description for DSO;
  • EA-6232: built -curl with HTTP/2 support;
  • added ea-php54 symlinks to /usr/bin and /usr/local/bin;
  • EA-3685: does not create apache user/group since we use nobody.

ea-php54-php-5.4.45-38.cloudlinux

ea-php55-php-5.5.38-22.cloudlinux

ea-php56-php-5.6.30-15.cloudlinux

ea-php70-php-7.0.20-3.cloudlinux

ea-php71-php-7.1.6-3.cloudlinux

  • added requiring for ea-libnghttp2;
  • EA-6484: clarified Summary and Description for DSO;
  • EA-6232: built -curl with HTTP/2 support.

This release fixes the issue "Unable to load dynamic library '/opt/cpanel/ea-phpХХ/root/usr/lib64/php/modules/curl.so' - libnghttp2.so.14".

To update run the command:

yum update ea-php*
Categories: Technology

Another street preacher cleared of all charges

Christian Concern - Thu, 13/07/2017 - 12:02
Another street preacher was cleared of a public order offence charge last week at Nottingham Magistrates' Court.

Only a week after Mike Overd and Michael Stockwell's public order convictions were overturned at Bristol Crown Court, another preacher has been acquitted of a public order offence charge. 

Supported by the Christian Legal Centre, Andrew Frost was acquitted last week at Nottingham Magistrates' Court.

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