Blogroll: Peter Leithart

I read blogs, as well as write one. The 'blogroll' on this site reproduces some posts from some of the people I enjoy reading. There are currently 119 posts from the blog 'Peter Leithart.'

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My blog is a public notebook, featuring essays, notes, and explorations on Scripture, theology, literature, politics, culture.
Updated: 1 hour 18 min ago

Thanksgiving, Multiplier of Grace

Wed, 22/11/2017 - 12:00
Thanksgiving was clearly a part of the liturgical life of the early Christians. In talking about tongues, Paul says that one who does not know the tongue cannot join in the “Amen” at the eucharistia , since he cannot understand what has been said (1 Corinthians 14:16). Paul uses the word in two places in 2 Corinthians. […]
Categories: People I don't know

Colonizing Liberalism

Tue, 21/11/2017 - 12:00
The history of the world, proponents of liberalism argue, is the history of the struggle for freedom, the struggle between freedom and slavery. Democracy also sees history as a struggle, in this case the struggle to establish the power of the people. As Ruszard Legutko (Demon in Democracy) puts it: “the history of the world […]
Categories: People I don't know

Public Legacies of the Reformation

Tue, 21/11/2017 - 11:00
Below is a portion of my opening comments at an ETS session on “public legacies of the Reformation,” presented on November 16, 2017. I was asked to identify the legacies of the Reformation that help us face the emerging challenges of the present day. Before I attempt to answer, let me indulge that venerable academic […]
Categories: People I don't know

Modernization Projects

Mon, 20/11/2017 - 11:00
Ryszard Legutko’s The Demon in Democracy is a bracing read. Legutko, a Polish philosopher and member of the European Parliament, has lived under both communism and liberalism, and so is unusually well-positioned to articulate his counter-intuitive thesis: “both attitudes – the communist and the liberal-democratic – are linked by  . . . some common principles […]
Categories: People I don't know

Slipping to Locke

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 14:00
Locke is often seen as the heir to Reformation political theology. Ruben Alvarado (Calvin and the Whigs) begs to differ. Locke was waiting in the wings when Calvinist politics eroded. He writes: “Puritans founded some of the chief colonies in America, those of New England, and their influence was by no means negligible among the […]
Categories: People I don't know

Two Koreas

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 14:00
While in North Korea, President Trump held back on schoolyard insults to Kim Jong-un, and focused on the damage that Kim’s regime has caused to North Koreans: “Far from valuing its people as equal citizens, this cruel dictatorship measures them, scores them, and ranks them based on the most arbitrary indications of their allegiance to the […]
Categories: People I don't know

The Original Structuralist

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 14:00
Adam Kuper reviewed Emmanuelle Loyer’s Claude Levi-Strauss in a 2016 issue of the TLS. A few noteworthy tidbits. It’s intriguing that the great classifier of kin relations should come from a densely interconnected family: “Lévi-Strauss grew up in a densely intermarried family circle made up exclusively of cultivated Parisian Jews of Alsatian descent. . . . All […]
Categories: People I don't know

Liturgy of Liberalism

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 12:30
Adrian Vermeule has a brilliant review of Ryszard Legutko’s Demon in Democracy. He begins with Tocqueville’s observation that the French Revolution “developed into a species of religion” but one without ritual. Legutko, and Vermeule following him, dissent: “The Revolution’s descendants not only possess a theology and eschatology, but a central sacrament and an accompanying liturgy. Indeed, […]
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Secularizing Covenant

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 12:30
In an essay on covenant as a political concept, Daniel Elazar briefly traces the development of covenant, and its relation to natural law, from Philo to Spinoza. Reformed theorists like Althusius loom large, what with their recovery and expansion of the biblical conception of “covenant.” Elazar writes, “The federal theology which they articulated (federal is derived […]
Categories: People I don't know

The Politicization of Everyday Life

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 12:30
How did everything get politicized – every choice of a favorite beer, every style decision, every nook and cranny of everyday life? Bruce Schulman blames it on Rolling Stone magazine. As he writes, “/the magazine embraced the countercultural ideal of authenticity — living life to the fullest, right now, within a community of like-minded, liberated […]
Categories: People I don't know

Albanian as Literary Language

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 11:00
Albanian isn’t usually considered an important literary language, but Albanian novelist Ismail Kadare explained in an interview with the Paris Review how the language merges classical and modern forms of literary expression: “Albanian is simply an extraordinary means of expression—rich, malleable, adaptable. As I have said in my latest novel, Spiritus, it has modalities that exist […]
Categories: People I don't know

This Little Babe

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 11:00
Infants and toddlers can’t dress, feed, or transport themselves. Yet in the paradoxical world of the Bible, their very weakness makes them strong. One Child, the Davidic one with the government on His shoulders, is strong enough to overthrow Satan. As a prep for Advent, sing this once a day, preferably in Benjamin Britten’s setting, […]
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One Lord, One Faith, One Music

Fri, 17/11/2017 - 11:00
In The Whole Church Sings (41), Robin Leaver summarizes Andreas Karlstadt’s 53 theses against Gregorian chant (1521): “It is a consecutive tirade, not particularly well-organized, against all forms of liturgical music then current, not just Gregorian chant, which is dismissed as the ‘mumblings of the unlearned’ (Thesis 31). Chant sung in the Mass and daily Office […]
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Apocalyptic Job

Thu, 16/11/2017 - 12:00
Some notes following a discussion about Job with the Theopolis Fellows. 1) Theopolis student John Crawford pointed out that Job is described as blameless (tam) at the outset of the book. It’s the same word used for Noah, Abraham, and Jacob but it is also used in the sacrificial system. An offering must be without blemish […]
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Jesus and the Children

Thu, 16/11/2017 - 11:00
Children have a high profile already in the Hebrew Bible. Jesus raises the stakes immeasurably. He is the Word made flesh, Word made baby.
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Who Is Roy Moore?

Wed, 15/11/2017 - 13:21
I have defended Alabama Senate candidate Judge Roy Moore’s  statements about God and law, but his conduct is indefensible. Not only in decades past but in the past week. Four women have charged that Moore made sexual advances when he was thirty-plus and they were teenagers. One was only 14 when, she claims, Moore undressed and fondled […]
Categories: People I don't know

Children of Promise

Wed, 15/11/2017 - 11:00
God created man male and female, blessed them, and commanded them to be fruitful, multiply, and fill the earth (Genesis 1:28-29). Procreation is one of the most basic vocations of human beings. The language of “fruitfulness” is originally used of the seed- and fruit-bearing plants called from earth on Day 3 of the creation week. […]
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Myth of 1648

Tue, 14/11/2017 - 12:00
The Peace of Westphalia (1648) has been marked as a turning point in European political history, the origin of the modern international system of sovereign territorial states. Benno Teschke (Myth of 1648) summarizes the thesis: “After 1648, formalized relations between modern sovereign states suspended the criss-crossing relations between heterogeneous feudal actors capped by the hierarchical […]
Categories: People I don't know

Suffer the Children

Tue, 14/11/2017 - 11:00
Judith Gundry’s contribution to The Child in the Bible examines the place of children in Mark’s gospel, with particular focus on the episode of Jesus blessing the children. It’s an illuminating essay. Mark includes no infancy narratives, but regularly shows Jesus exerting the power of the kingdom to rescue and save children: “Jesus performs miracles […]
Categories: People I don't know

Justification in the Age of Emancipation

Mon, 13/11/2017 - 11:00
In his Happiness Paradox, Ziyad Marar explores the sources of “justification.” Humiliation is a uniquely human form of suffering. How do we deal with it? Our strategies for staving off humiliation are strategies of “justification.” Freud offers some possibilities, He “enumerates a range of ways we avoid this kind of suffering, including becoming a hermit or […]
Categories: People I don't know

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